Two Minute Tuesday: Configuring Interview Statuses

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

PCR’s Pipeline is your hub for tracking the recruitment process, and so you’ll want the interview statuses in it to reflect your organization’s own unique workflow. In this Two Minute Tuesday we’re going to look at how to set up your database’s pipeline to mirror your process, which is key for effectively monitoring and reporting, plus setting up time-saving features like automated notification emails to candidates and hiring managers.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, join our LinkedIn Users Group, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

Here comes another Two Minute Tuesday, Main Sequence’s series of short videos with tips, tricks, and tutorials to help make you a more powerful PCRecruiter user.

PCR’s Pipeline is your hub for tracking the recruitment process, and so you’ll want the interview statuses in it to reflect your organization’s own unique workflow. Today we’re going to look at how to set up your database’s pipeline to mirror your process, which is key for effectively monitoring and reporting, plus setting up time-saving features like automated notification emails to candidates and hiring managers.

When you first get into PCR, a default set of Types and Statuses are already in place. ‘Types’ are the main categories and ‘Statuses’ are the subcategories within each Type. For example, we have a Type called ‘In-Person,’ with Statuses for first interview and second interview beneath it, and we have an ‘Out-of-Process’ Type, with Statuses to indicate why the candidate was not suitable for this particular opening.

If you’re a PCRecruiter admin user, you can adjust the database’s pipeline configuration by clicking System and searching for “Interview Status Codes”. When we go into this area, we’ll see a list of the Statuses to start with. We can edit or delete them with the Action dropdowns, or use the ‘plus’ icon in the Action menu to create new ones.

Each Status has a code, which is an abbreviated label for this stage in the process (10-character maximum), a longer description, and an indication of which major Type it belongs under. For example, if we wanted to add a Status for a second telephone interview, we’d click the ‘Add’ icon, create a code, give it a description, and use the pulldown to associate it with the Telephone Type. The Priority dropdown allows you to define the listing order of the Statuses within a given Type – they’ll be alphabetical if you leave it at zero. If your organization is required to do EEOC reporting, special codes can be created for that too.

You may also want to change the major Types. While new Types cannot be added or deleted, the system’s built-in ones can be relabeled or hidden. We’ll do that with this icon in the Action menu. In this screen, we can give the Types new abbreviated codes and long descriptions to suit our needs. We can also use these checkboxes to hide any Types that we don’t need. In this database, many of the Types have already been hidden away, and the first ‘user defined’ Type has been configured to act as an ‘Offer’ stage.

Relabeling the Types and creating custom Statuses gives us lots of flexibility. We could, for example, hide the ‘Telephone’ Type, re-label ‘In-Person’ to simply call it ‘Interviewed’, and then create Statuses under it to track in-person, phone, and video interviews. Just be aware that these settings will apply to all of the users and jobs in this database, so you’ll want to define your Types and Statuses broadly enough to suit all of the sourcing and placement steps you’d need to track.

For more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter, join the LinkedIn PCRecruiter user group, and watch our blog posts on your PCR login screen. If you have any ideas for future Two Minute Tuesdays, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

Two Minute Tuesday: Deleting & Changing Users

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

Recruiting, staffing, and sourcing simply wouldn’t be a thing if everyone stayed in one job forever. But what happens when someone leaves your company? In this week’s Two Minute Tuesday video, we’re going to look at what an admin user can do with the records when a PCRecruiter user leaves the organization.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, join our LinkedIn Users Group, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

It’s time for Two Minute Tuesday, Main Sequence’s series of short videos with tips, tricks, and tutorials to help make you a more powerful PCRecruiter user.

Recruiting, staffing, and sourcing simply wouldn’t be a thing if everyone stayed in one job forever. But what happens when someone leaves your company? Today we’re going to look at what an admin user can do with the records when a PCRecruiter user leaves the organization.

When someone exits the scene, you may simply want to delete their account. User changes are made under System > Manage Users. We’ll select the user who’s gone, and then click the Delete icon in the action panel. This won’t remove or change any of the records that belonged to them – it will just remove their login account.

If the user is on temporary leave or may come back later, we can open the ‘Security’ panel. At the bottom, under Security Policy, you’ll find the ‘Account is disabled’ option. Checking this box and saving the record prevents the user from logging in without actually deleting their account.

Now, let’s say we’ve hired someone to take over the desk and we want to change all of the existing records for that account over to the new person. We can do this by clicking the icon to the right of the User Name field, and changing the username. We can also get to this panel by searching for Change User Name under System.

We want to enter the new username here – ten characters maximum. When we apply the change, PCR scours the database for all historical data created by this user and changes the username field on it to the new one. This feature is also handy when a user has a new last name and wants to change their username to match. One item to note – if the person was using PCR’s internal email client, those email records are stored in a separate database and will not be altered when you change the username. You’ll want to contact support@mainsequence.net for details on linking old emails to a new username.

What if we want to assign only the outgoing user’s jobs to another current user, or if we want to change only certain name, company, and job records? Well, an admin can change the username field on each record manually, but we can alter multiple records at once with the global change features under System.

We’ll search for “Change”, and then select “Change Positions.” The Predefined Field we want to alter is “User Name”. We can use the selector here to limit the changes to a specific Rollup list of jobs, or we can fill the ‘Original Value’ box with the old username so that the system simply finds and changes all positions marked with that username. The same principles apply to changing name or company records. When you use these global change features, the username field on the record is changed to the new username, while all of the activity history, interviews, and so on associated with it remain tagged with the original username.

For more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter, join the LinkedIn PCRecruiter user group, and watch our blog posts on your PCR login screen. If you have any topics or suggestions for future Two Minute Tuesdays, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

Two Minute Tuesday: Rudiments of Keyword Searching

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

For this week’s Two Minute Tuesday video, we’re going to go over using Boolean keyword search methods in PCRecruiter to find the candidates, jobs, and contacts you’re looking for.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, join our LinkedIn Users Group, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

We’re back with another Two Minute Tuesday, Main Sequence’s series of short videos with tips, tricks, and tutorials to help make you a more powerful PCRecruiter user.

This week, we’re going to look at the rudiments of keyword searching. You’ll find keyword search boxes on the Basic and Advanced Name, Company, and Position search screens, among others. PCR’s keyword search includes the content of the Resume, Notes, Summary, Profile forms, and Keywords areas of your records, but it does not include data in discretely labeled fields, like ‘Job Title’ or ‘Last Name’. Our Lucene search engine, which offers searching of text file attachments as well as many more complex search queries and support for significantly larger databases is also available – contact your Main Sequence rep for details.

At the simplest level, we just enter a few terms separated by spaces into the keyword search box. Here, on the Advanced Name Search screen, we’ll enter marketing development sales. PCRecruiter will return records with any of these words in any of the keyword indexed areas of the record, ordered by relevance. If we want to limit the search to specific indexed areas of the record, such as the resume only, we can change the ‘Limit’ pulldown. We can also designate whether partial word matches should be included, such as “salesman” or “salesforce.”

To refine the search, we’ll need to use Boolean operations: AND, NOT, OR, and NEAR, as well as quotes and parentheses. Here’s how these work:

Using AND (all caps) before a term makes it a required criteria for the search results, while NOT excludes the term that follows it. For example, if we search marketing AND development NOT sales, we’re going to find records that contain the first term and the second one, but do not contain the third.

We can also nest search terms with parentheses. For example: (sales OR marketing) AND (development OR bizdev). When you use parentheses, the system runs the queries inside the parentheses first; so here we’ll only get back records with either of the terms from the first pair, and either of the terms from the second pair.

We can search for phrases by using quotes. For example: “business development”. Now we’ll get records with the words business and development immediately adjacent to each other.

To find words close to, but not right next to each other, we keep the quotes and include the NEAR operator. “Business NEAR Development” finds any record where those two words are within ten words of each other. We can narrow or expand the range by specifying a number. For example, “business NEAR5 development” will return records where those words are five or less words apart.

You can mix and match these techniques to create very refined keyword searches, but keep in mind that the more complex your query is, the more time it’ll take PCR to return the results.
When you get your search results back, you’ll see a letter indicating where in the record the terms were found. P for Profiles, N for Notes or Keywords, R for resume. Click on the letter, and the search terms are highlighted in context.

This is just the tip of the searching iceberg and we’ll dig into more related topics in the future. But for now, subscribe to this YouTube channel and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter, and watch your PCR login screen. If you have any suggestions for future Two Minute Tuesdays, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

Two Minute Tuesday: Candidate Submittal Workflow

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

In our Two Minute Tuesday video this week, we’re going to go over one possible workflow for handling the submission of a candidate to the hiring authority. We’re also touching on pipeline email templates.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, join our LinkedIn Users Group, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

We’re back with another Two Minute Tuesday, Main Sequence’s series of short videos with tips, tricks, and tutorials to help make you a more powerful PCRecruiter user.

PCR’s flexibility and configurability means being able to accomplish many tasks in multiple ways, and sometimes it can be helpful to see how someone else gets a job done. Today we’re going to walk through one workflow for submitting a potential hire to a manager which you may want to try out for yourself.

Let’s say we’ve just added a new candidate to the database, and we know she’d be perfect for one of our existing openings. We want to put her into the job’s pipeline and email her info to the hiring contact.

We’ll start by typing part of the job title into the Quick Find box. Now that we’ve found our job, we can use the “Add Interview” icon here to begin logging the submittal. Remember that in PCRecruiter, an “Interview Record” is generated for every step in the process of connecting a person with a job, not just the actual person-to-person interviews. A resume submittal or an online inquiry by the candidate is often the first Interview Record in the process.

We’ll search for the candidate by name or any other field, and select them from the list. Now we get the ‘Add Interview’ screen. The “Interview Type/Status” box is already set to my Resume Submittal status because I’ve previously used the configure icon here to make that my default option. We can fill in any other details, and click “Save.” Now, we have an interview record in the pipeline for the job so that the submittal date and time are available for tracking and reporting.

Next, we can click the “Email” option at the bottom of the window to send this candidate’s details to the hiring contact. When the window pops up, our default Pipeline Email template appears. In this database, the pipeline email has been written as a personal letter to the manager. You’ll see all the relevant details have been automatically merged into the letter, which we can then hand-edit however we please before sending it.

Pipeline Emails are a special class of form letter that can be configured from the System area. When we’re creating one, the ‘Insert Fields’ option allows us to merge in practically any details from the name, the company, the job, and the interview record. The letter can be as simple or complex as you wish. The template labeled as “Default” will always come up first, but we can use the ‘Template’ button in the email screen to switch to any other template for other uses, such as emailing the details on an interview to an internal administrator, or emailing them to the candidate.

Using the sidebar, we can see that the candidate’s resume is going to be sent along with the email by default. We can add additional attachments, and even include a meeting request, before sending the email to the manager, the candidate, or even a list of contacts.

For more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter, join the LinkedIn PCRecruiter user group, and watch our blog posts on your PCR login screen. If you have any ideas for future Two Minute Tuesdays, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

Two Minute Tuesday: MyPCR Search Links

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

We’re looking at yet another way to customize and configure PCRecruiter to suit your sourcing and recruiting process in this week’s Two Minute Tuesday video. Today we’re walking through adding a custom search to your MyPCR screen.

Note: The ‘invalid email’ search shown in this video is not valid for databases using the Lucene search engine.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, join our LinkedIn Users Group, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

We’re back with another Two Minute Tuesday, Main Sequence’s series of short videos with tips, tricks, and tutorials to help make you a more powerful PCRecruiter user.

The MyPCR screen is a great place to see quick stats and access hot lists and links when you first log into PCRecruiter. In this episode, we’re going to look at using custom search links on your MyPCR screen. You can use any Name, Company, or Job search query that you build in the Advanced Search screen, or an SQL query entered by hand.

For this example, we’ll choose a simple search. Let’s say our colleague, Raymond, is entering lots of name records into the database. Some of them may be missing the email address, and he’s going to go back and fill them in later. We want to keep tabs on the project and let him know if he’s forgotten to complete them.

To start we’ll go to the Advanced Name Search and create a query. For the first search term, we want Predefined Fields > Email Address > Is Empty. We click ‘Add’ to lock in the term. We can also catch improperly formatted addresses by choosing Predefined Fields > Email Address > Not Like > %@%.%. The percentage sign is a search wildcard, so this will find any emails that aren’t in the usual “something at something dot something” format. We’ll click ‘Add’ again, and we’ll set this the dropdown to “OR” so we find records matching either term. Lastly, we’ll limit this to Raymond’s records by choosing Predefined Fields > User Name > Equal, and selecting his username from the popup. We’ll set this second dropdown to “End Group / And” so that the first “OR” search is grouped together, and the username search is treated as a requirement in addition to that result.

If we expand the ‘Query’ section, we can see the structured query language that we’ve just built. We’re going to highlight and copy it. Now we’ll load the My PCR screen and open the Configure option from the Action menu. We want to configure the ‘Search Links’ item from the sidebar.

To start, we’re going to give this search a descriptive title. Now we paste the query into the Search box. Next, we tell the system whether this is a Name, Company, or Position search.

Let’s stop at this point and save the configuration. We can see our new search in the Custom Stats area with a number indicating how many matching results exist. Clicking on the item will run the search so we can view the names that need to be completed.

Let’s go back into the config screen and add a notification. It’s ok if Raymond’s got a handful of incomplete records at a time, but if there are 10 or more, then we want a notification so that we can give him a reminder. That’s where the Notification Trigger comes in. We’ll set it to “Greater Than 9” and add a Popup Message. Now, if the number of results for this query gets to ten, we’ll get an alert popup whenever we load the MyPCR screen.

For more complex searches check out the list of custom queries in the PCR 9 Learning Center, or contact Main Sequence support to ask about custom queries for your particular needs.
And for more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter, join the LinkedIn PCRecruiter user group, and watch our blog posts on your PCR login screen. If you have any suggestions for future Two Minute Tuesdays, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.