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Two Minute Tuesday: Stationery & Signatures

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

Today’s Two Minute Tuesday looks into creating signatures and stationery in PCRecruiter, and the reasons why you may want to have both. Even those of you using the PCRecruiter Portal for MS Outlook will likely want a signature configured for use with bulk emails and form letters.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

Welcome to another “Two Minute Tuesday,” Main Sequence’s series of very short videos with handy tips, helpful tutorials and hot topics related to PCRecruiter.

In this week’s edition we’re going to talk about the email signature and email stationery features in PCR. Both of these items can be configured from the ‘Email Setup’ area under ‘System.’

When you launch an outbound email from PCR, you’ll always start with either an empty document, or with a saved template or form letter. When you’re opening a new, non-form-letter email, PCR usually gives you a blank page to type into. But if you have configured a stationery, then that stationery will be loaded as your starting point rather than the default blank document.

In your stationery, you can define not only a signoff for your email, but other elements like headers or sidebars or background images. You probably won’t want to get too wild with the layout though. Emails with lots of fonts, colors, and images not only can look unpredictably different on computers other than your own, but can also make spam filters a bit more suspicious, and generally tend to have a lower response rate than emails that are less fancy and more personal.

It’s possible to enable or disable the stationery at any time with the dropdown at the right of the setup screen. You can even store multiple stationeries in the system if you need to switch between them for any reason.

Many people choose not to use a stationery, but simply set up a signature. Using the dropdown on the configuration screen, you can set your signature to be automatically appended to the bottom of all blank emails you begin. Alternately, you can choose the “Select Signature for Each Email” option, which allows you to manually add the signature to your messages whenever and wherever you please by clicking this icon in the editing toolbar.

We recommend creating a signature even if you’re going to use stationery, because the signature is also used whenever you have a template or form letter containing the “current user email signature” merge tag. This is great for situations where multiple users need to send the same form letter, but want to include a personal sign-off. Just add the tag wherever the signature should appear in the form letter, and the system will place your signature there when you send that email to one or more people.

Remember, if you have both a stationery and signature active, the stationery will be loaded as the starting point for your one-off emails, and the signature will remain available for use in form letters or any time that you click the ‘signature’ toolbar icon.

For more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel and watch our social networks or your PCR login screen. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

People are sticking with PCRecruiter

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in News

The numbers for 2015 are in and we are breaking many of our own records. Most proudly, Main Sequence realized an overall client retention rate of 95% last year!

Having the vast majority of our customers remain on board with PCRecruiter makes us happy not only because it means that users are satisfied with our solution, but it’s also a great indication of their continuing success and the health of the recruiting and staffing market space at large.

We’re already breaking new records in 2016, and we look forward to sharing more exciting announcements with you soon.

Two Minute Tuesday: HTML Job Descriptions

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

In this Two Minute Tuesday we’ll look at best practices for entering job descriptions in PCRecruiter’s HTML editor. We’ll talk about the difference between using “Enter” and “Shift+Enter,” and about how to make sure your descriptions are clear of inline font formatting so that your jobs can be consistent on the web.

NOTE: You can also use the ‘Tx’ icon in the HTML editing toolbar to wipe all formatting from your highlighted text.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

It’s time for another “Two Minute Tuesday,” Main Sequence’s weekly series of very short videos designed to highlight often overlooked PCRecruiter features, concepts, or best practices in a convenient couple of minutes.

In this “Two Minute Tuesday” we’re going to talk about job descriptions. PCRecruiter stores all job descriptions in HTML format, and PCR 9’s industry-standard HTML editor is largely self-explanatory, but understanding a bit about how it works with HTML can help you create more visually consistent job descriptions.

Proper HTML only describes a document’s structure, not its appearance. It “marks up” which parts are paragraphs, headings, or list items, but says nothing about their fonts, colors, sizes or spacing. If my job description only contains structure markings and not visual styling, it will automatically take on the styling of the website or document it appears in. Right now it’s being displayed in the default styling of the HTML editor itself.

This “Qualifications” line should be a heading. My instinct might be to change its appearance with the font size pulldown, but the better method is to mark the text as a heading, using this dropdown here. My website’s got rules about what styling should be applied to headings, so my job description’s headings should automatically follow those rules. As a bonus, if those rules change when I revise my website, I won’t have to update all my job descriptions.

Another thing you should be aware of is ‘shift-enter.’ If I’m typing within a paragraph and I hit enter, all I’ve done is added a line break into my current paragraph. When I hold shift and hit enter, the editor creates a new paragraph. My website’s already got style rules regarding how much margin should be between paragraphs, headings, and so on, so when I insert line breaks where I really mean to start a new paragraph, the spacing could be off. Shift- enter works in reverse while I’m working inside a list… simply hitting enter creates a new list item, while using shift-enter creates a line break inside of my current list element.
Lastly, job description source documents often lack proper structure markings, so when you copy and paste into any HTML editor, including PCR’s, the software’s best guesses about line breaks, bullets, and so on may be incorrect. It’s always best to start with unformatted text or type descriptions directly into the editor if at all possible. If you’re using the Chrome browser, there’s a shortcut; copy your text, and then use CTRL-Shift-V, which pastes only the unformatted text into the editor. Then just re-apply the structure markup from there.

For more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel and watch our social networks or your PCR login screen. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

Two Minute Tuesday: Import Contacts from LinkedIn

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

Another Two Minute Tuesday video is here! This time we’re going to walk through exporting your contacts from LinkedIn as a CSV file and importing them into your PCRecruiter database with the Generic File Mapper/Importer. This is a great way to load up contacts for a new recruiting desk or when you’re getting started with a fresh database.


Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

Welcome to this week’s “Two Minute Tuesday,” Main Sequence’s weekly series of very short videos with tips, tutorials and techniques designed to help you become a more powerful PCRecruiter user in just a couple of minutes.

In this episode we’re going to walk through importing a list of contacts from LinkedIn, which can be handy when you’re just getting started with PCR or if you add a new recruiter to your office and want to load their connections into the database.

You can import them one at a time of course, and there are browser plugins that can shortcut the process, but if you want to bring all of your LinkedIn contact data into the system at once, here’s how to do it.
Under “My Network” on LinkedIn, open “Connections”. Now click this little Settings gear on the right, and under ‘Advanced Settings’ you’ll find an Export option. The default data format is a text file with comma-separated values, otherwise known as a .CSV, and that’s just what we want. Click export and fill out the Security Verification to start the download.

The data that’s included in the export will depend on your particular LinkedIn account and connections. I’ve opened my exported data in Excel and deleted all of the empty data columns to save myself some hunting in a later step.

Now, in PCR, we’ll go to the quick-add icon in the upper right, and choose Name. We want to Import a List.
Step one is to create or select a rollup list (see last week’s episode for more on those). I’m going to pick this empty list I made earlier. We can choose from a few pre-loaded data formats, but for this purpose we want the Generic Importer.

Now we browse for the CSV file. The default settings here are just fine for our purposes. After we click ‘Next’, we click in these boxes here to choose which column in the CSV should be imported into each PCRecruiter field listed on the left. My data only had names, companies, email addresses, and job titles, so I can leave the rest alone.

We click “Next” again, and specify how the system should handle any duplicates. I’m going to tell it to update any existing records in the database with the data from the CSV if the Name and Company both match exactly. If there’s no exact match, a fresh record will be made. Any contacts that have no company name at all will be imported into the default candidate pool company.

When we click “Import”, the system starts creating name and company records as appropriate for everyone in the CSV, and adds all the names to the selected Rollup so they’re easy to start working with.
As a final tip, you might want to consider having a blank database added to your PCRecruiter account for doing big imports like this. That way you can make sure the imported data all looks correct and clean before transferring the records from the empty database into your live one.

For more Two Minute Tuesdays, subscribe to this YouTube channel and watch our social networks or your PCR login screen. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.

Two Minute Tuesday: What is a Rollup?

Written by Andrew Rothman on . Posted in Topics, Two Minute Tuesday

In this week’s new Two Minute Tuesday video, we’re talking about Rollups. Rollup lists are one of the most powerful tools in the PCRecruiter toolbox, but are often underutilized or misunderstood by new users (and even seasoned ones). This video gives the overview, and in future editions we’ll get into some of the cool things a Rollup can be used for.


Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or YouTube to stay in the loop, and watch the lower portion of of your PCRecruiter login screen for all the latest blog posts and updates.

If you have any comments or suggestions for something we can explain in about two minutes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net

Video Transcript

It’s time for this week’s “Two Minute Tuesday,” Main Sequence’s series of very short videos designed to highlight often overlooked PCRecruiter features, concepts, or best practices in a convenient couple of minutes.

This week, “What is a Rollup?” Rollups are one of PCRecruiter’s most powerful features, and yet they’re often misunderstood or underutilized by newer users.

In the simplest terms, you can use a Rollup to group together (or roll up) any bunch of names, companies, and/or jobs. Common reasons for grouping records are to save search results, which you can then sub-search and sort within, manage calling lists, send a bulk email or text message, filter job boards and reports, export and sync with other databases, and make changes to, delete, copy, or move lots of records all at once.

The most common way to roll records up is to run a search, select some or all of the records, and then click the rollup icon in the actions menu at the upper right. You’ll see your most recently viewed rollups presented first. You may be wondering about these name, company, and position columns. Well, think of every rollup list like a three-page pad of paper, with one infinite sheet for each of the three record types. These columns indicate how many of each type of record are on the list. In most cases, my lists will contain just names, companies, or jobs alone, but if I wanted to roll up all of my jobs, contacts, and candidates in Cleveland together, I could put them all on the same Cleveland list. Keep in mind that any one record can be on as many rollups as you wish, but the same record can’t appear on the same rollup more than once.

Now, if I wanted to add the records I selected earlier to an existing list, I’d just select a recent rollup or click “Rollups” in the sidebar to search within all of the lists in my database. But right now, I want to create a new rollup, so I click “Add Rollup”. The Description is all that’s required, but I may want to categorize the list or write a memo about what it’s for. When I click save, PCR generates a new list and puts my selected records on it. If there are a lot of records, I can minimize the window and go about my work in the system while the list is compiled.

You’ll also find a “Rollup” option in the navigation menu on names, companies, and jobs for managing a single record’s appearance on related lists, and a ‘Rollups’ option in the main menu, where you’ll go to manage and work inside of your lists in general.

In future episodes we’ll talk about some of the handy things you can do with Rollups, but that’s it for this week’s Two Minute Tuesday. For more, subscribe to this YouTube channel and watch our social networks or your PCR login screen. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, send an email to twominutetuesday@mainsequence.net.